Monday, 08 August 2016 22:41

Idea Management in Higher Education Featured

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Idea Management

In order to support students in their academic efforts, the notion of Idea Management can offer a series of processes and strategies that can tie together, both conceptually and practically, their interactions with important and recurring concepts. Such processes can be reflected in assessments that are designed to help students articulate their thoughts, to themselves, their academic communities and their assessors, in a coherent and complete manner.

Idea management is a notion that speaks to the highly interactive nature of the flipped classroom, a model that is quickly gaining prominence, especially in Australia and elsewhere. Many current assessment strategies include opportunities for students to demonstrate competency through a variety of practical activities. Students now need a structured, holistic approach to these assessments that will allow them to compile and curate the range of ideas, skills and concepts that they produce through their classroom and assessment work and that are related to the various practices they are expected to master. These processes will be designed to support their ability to recall and reuse concepts and strategies across units.

Variation Theory

The ability to recall and reuse, and apply concepts speaks to the issue of threshold concepts. In many areas of study, the ability to be successful relies on students being able to grasp elemental concepts and then develop and build on those concepts. Variation theory, as means of working with threshold concepts provides a means of modelling activities that support student success.

Variation theory may be viewed as an application of Schema Theory (Ausubel) supported by Differentiation and the notion of Ill-structured knowledge domains (Spiro). Schema theory suggests that in order to understand a new concept, we must be able to place or attach it to the context of our current understanding. Ill-structured knowledge domains consider the idea that knowledge is not usually linear and hence requires a variety of ways to represent and understand it. Differentiation suggests that we all learn in different ways. Hence, variation theory suggests that we might learn better if we are given opportunities to interact with new knowledge in different ways in order to account for all of its permutations and combinations.

Feedback

Feedback from a number of fellow colleagues in higher education suggest that a coherent strategy would be appreciated and would offer meaningful support, both longitudinally beyond the duration of a unit through a course, and concurrently across units. Feedback also supports the development of a coherent strategy that could be modelled for other units and courses. Feedback from literacy advisors indicates that there is need of an overarching strategy that can support students to address their other literacy needs and that can be used to track progress and to guide further personal development.

Idea Management and Student Work Space

The notion of a student work space refers to a set of tools, and processes to make the best use of these tools in the pursuit of excellence. One of the elements of this approach will be a curated collection of work to serve assessment purposes.

A structured work space for idea management outlined through assessments provides students a range of lifelong learning skills including communication and presentation skills, collaboration and participation skills, analysis through curation, and critical self-reflection. It also provides a set of skills that help students to function in a knowledge economy and that will provide coherency and consistency across the span of a student’s university career and hopefully beyond as they pursue lifelong learning.

The activities that support and are supported by this approach also speak to a range of learning items including learning styles. The notion of differentiation discusses the value of presenting information in different ways, and the need to consider the students learning styles as well as our own. 

We need to consider how students take in information and ‘digest’ it. Most people learn in a variety of ways but will have a preference or a particular strength in learning in one of these ways. We also need to be very cautious not to generalize from our own experiences when trying to understand how others learn.

Students receive ideas and information from a variety of sources, and are expected to do a variety of things with that information:

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Another way of viewing this work is to look at it through a sequential process.

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Students themselves are often not aware of how they learn and so should be given the opportunity to experience multi-modal methodologies. For example:

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  • Auditory learners: Learn from or when hearing others talk.
    • How: Let them talk! When they speak aloud they quickly realize they do or do not know what they are talking about.
    • Let others talk
    • Share videos online
  • Visual learners: Need to see the information
    • How: Write new concepts and vocabulary on the board – leave them there as a reference throughout the lesson
    • Use presentation tools with graphic images with or instead of text.
    • Let students design their own graphics and concepts maps.
  • Kinesthetic learners: Need to move or physically interact with information
    • How: Provide opportunity to take notes, remind them to write something down
    • Let them get up and write on the board,
    • Let them handle things (manipulatives – e.g. spreadsheets), “hands on” activities,
    • Work in groups to make a concept map.

How do we then integrate these methods into our classes?

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By providing structures for work spaces, associated classroom activities, and incorporating these processes into formal assessments, the faculty can encourage students to come to class much better prepared for the flipped classroom. By employing cloud storage tools to capture and share ideas, students should always have access to their work and be able to draw upon previous work and documentation.

The notion of “Making Thinking Visible” allows students and faculty to externalize their ideas – to literally take the ideas out of our heads – and through the use of various media create ‘discrete’ ideas which can be manipulated, shared, sequenced and put on display for others.

By using a few select, freely available tools, students can bring their old ideas with them to new classes. They can reflect on past work and make connections by virtue of having a range of thoughts and ideas arrayed before

Format

Students should use their own cloud storage tools for the actual storage of their data in its various formats. There are a variety of different tools available.

Google is recommended because it offers a range of tools under one log-in account and is already widely used around the world. It also offers longevity for the account, easier access to other account holders, ample storage space and an integrated suite of tools.

The following is a selection of tools and purposes offered as examples.

Personal work space

  • Google Drive

    • provides ample cloud storage space (15GB)

    • Accessible from multiple devices and integrates into multiple platforms.

    • Can’t be forgotten at home.

    • Can’t be lost

  • YouTube

    • provides a video platform.

  • Twitter

    • can hold links, articles,

    • Share ideas

  • LinkedIn

    • Profile, employment related groups and discussions

    • Great source of professional communities

    • Can be linked, used for communication, updated and shared

Community work space

  • Google docs
    • Synchronous editing
    • Exports to Word, Excel, PPT.
    • Supports forms
    • Documents and videos from these platforms and from social media including Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. can be easily embedded.
  • vUWS
    • Discussion boards, wikis,

Assessment and Competency

  • vUWS

    • Supports assessment documentation and provides various efficiency means for assessing and providing feedback

      • Classroom activities

      • Work sheets

      • Quizzes and results

      • Presentations

      • Discussion boards

      • Wikis

  • Blogger

    • Can hold embedded documents, RSS feeds from Twitter, LinkedIn profile etc.

    • Can be used for reflective writing and exported.

    • Can be closed, shared, partially or fully public.

  • Folders:

    • Personal folders can be shared in such a way as to support assessment of individual items.

    • Folders can be assessed for such aspects as:

      • Completeness / inclusion of

        • Instructor and / or peer feedback

        • Individual homework items

        • Reflections on activities

      • Presentation of contents

        • Ease of access to contents

      • Curation

        • Are the contents representative of some element of the unit e.g. real world examples of unit content found in media / imagery

    • In class activities need to be:

      • Related to the weekly content in various formats in order to allow for the flipped model to function.

      • Map from outcome to activity to assessment needs to be explicit.

      • Can incorporate a point system for the portfolio activities.

      • Need to consider recurring strategies that allow the students to be familiar with what they need to do and what tools they might need to use.

Read 914 times Last modified on Thursday, 06 October 2016 00:50
Dr. Paul Leslie

Associate of Taos Institute: http://www.taosinstitute.net/

Education is a Community Affair. 

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www.paulleslie.net