Thursday, 23 June 2016 10:23

Digital Literacy Featured

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I am working with my new team at WSU to review and find means of helping students to manage the many varied tasks and challenges involved in being a successful learner. One of the issues that has arisen in my work is the challenge of managing our documents and pieces of information. Document storage may seem like the epitome of mundane tasks, but I consider documents to be physical repositories (even with virtual or soft copy documents) of our ideas. Hence, storage and nomenclature become second only to the contents of the documents. If we cannot find each other’s ideas, then we are poorer for that.

An integrated approach to file storage and naming can serve a number of purposes. The architecture alone of a clear folder system can indicate the relevance or documents without even having to open a document. Document retrieval is also greatly enhanced, almost as a side effect, although we might argue that said retrieval is the primary purpose of a clear filing protocol. Often, we start be trying to find one document and end up looking in a dozen different places for it.

folders

However, ideally, we want to start with a dozen different carefully itemized locations and quickly delve into the exact location for the one document we want to find.

folders reversed

However, the most important effect of being able to efficiently access our documents is to enhance our ability to access our ideas. As I have noted elsewhere, one form of practice for practitioners and / or students is to begin to wrestle with the myriad ill-structured domains of knowledge that they encounter in their daily professional life and employ what Jacobson and Spiro (1993) term, ‘cognitive flexibility’ to put their ideas into an accessible format that can be viewed and shared by other people. This practice will enable the practitioner to begin to both actively and passively share their ideas more readily and easily with their community of inquiry and, almost as a by-product, and with little tampering, provide a high-stakes showcase of competencies.

Similarly, in the process of epistemological curiosity, the practitioner can employ a portfolio approach that allows him or her opportunities to “assemble relevant abstract conceptual and case-specific knowledge components” (Jacobsen & Spiro, 1993, p. 3), better explain or organize those knowledge components, and then hold and examine them, almost as concrete objects, before putting them out into the world.

When considering whether new forms of media can alter our ways of thinking, we can reflect on McLuhan’s (1964) argument that the “medium is the message”. How do the new possibilities of the social media and web 2.0 technologies influence our abilities to share ideas? As years’ worth of students have told me, “I am doing it in my head”, ‘it’ being planning, outlining, organizing, preparing for assessments, and otherwise being a student. This is also true for practitioners or academics. ‘Doing it in our heads’ is certainly possible, how do others can access those ideas that are in our heads. With 21st century tools, practitioners can now be much more efficient in sharing their ideas with their community and stakeholders and thus creating the possibilities for growth.

References

Jacobsen, M., & Spiro, R. (1993). Hypertext Learning Environments, Cognitive Flexibility, and the Transfer of Complex Knowledge: An Empirical Investigation. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Center for the Study of Reading. Champaign, Illinois: College of education. Retrieved September 7, 2014, from https://www.ideals.illinois.edu/bitstream/handle/2142/17752/ctrstreadtechrepv01993i00573_opt.pdf?sequence=1

McLuhan, M. (1964). Understanding Media. Cornwall: Routledge.

Spiro, R. J. (1993). Cognitive Flexibility, Constructivism, and Hypertext: Random Access Instruction for Advanced Knowledge Acquisition in Ill-Structured Domains. Institute for Learning Technologies. http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/publications/papers/Spiro.html 

Read 695 times Last modified on Thursday, 23 June 2016 14:26
Dr. Paul Leslie

Associate of Taos Institute: http://www.taosinstitute.net/

Education is a Community Affair. 

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www.paulleslie.net